SkoolLive Proudly Supports Kumon Learning Centers

In 1954 in Japan, a grade 2 student by the name of Takeshi scored poorly in a math test. His mother, Teiko, asked her husband, Toru Kumon, to take a closer look at their son’s school textbooks. Being a high school math teacher, Toru Kumon thought Takeshi’s textbooks did not give children enough practice to be confident in a topic. Mr. Kumon decided to help his son by handwriting worksheets for him to practice. This was the start of the Kumon Method.
By the time Takeshi was in grade 6, he had studied his father’s daily hand-written worksheets for four years and could solve differential and integral calculus problems. Friends and neighbors noticed Takeshi’s achievements and asked Mr. Kumon to help their own children learn with this method. It was through this local word of mouth that the Kumon Method began to spread. In 1958 the Kumon Institute of Education was established in Osaka, Japan. In its first year of operation, Kumon attracted 300 students through recommendations by parents whose children had studied the Kumon Method.
The first Kumon franchise in Tokyo opened in 1962. Kumon franchises were soon opened in the United States of America, Brazil, Germany, Philippines, United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India and elsewhere. Today there are more than 4 million children of all ages and abilities studying with Kumon in 49 countries.
Kumon is a franchise model with Kumon Education Centers run by a senior Instructor and a team of Center Assistants. All Kumon Instructors are qualified and trained in the teaching of the Kumon method and are supported by Kumon office staff. Kumon Instructors are considered experts in the Kumon curriculum, observing students’ study habits and individualizing the programs to suit a student’s ability.
Kumon Assistants are often past Kumon students with a deep understanding of the method and its goals. Kumon Assistants are trained by Kumon Instructors.
Kumon Franchises advertise on SkoolLive Kiosks at high school campuses local to their Kumon Center.

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